“Profane Love”  takes its name from the original title for Domenikos Theotokopoulos’s (El Greco) last and unfinished work (the title since been changed to  The Opening of the Fifth Seal) . The imagery of this massive unfinished painting is the depiction of a cry for vengeance against oppressors from the Book of Revelations. Theorist Emile Durkheim regards “profane love” (in his analysis, our mundane daily concerns) in sharp contrast to “sacred love”.   I am using this El Greco painting as a framework for this body of work. I am interested in what I see as a depiction of the flesh and forms that express a particular perversion that seems to represent that which is both dead and vividly alive. The forms are rendered both in depth and flat, real and ephemeral. I am interested in these contrasts and contradictions. The thin parallel lines in the work are a device to contort the sense of space and disrupt the order of the layers and logic of the image. Agnes Martin is influential in this use of the lines as space 

“Profane Love” takes its name from the original title for Domenikos Theotokopoulos’s (El Greco) last and unfinished work (the title since been changed to The Opening of the Fifth Seal). The imagery of this massive unfinished painting is the depiction of a cry for vengeance against oppressors from the Book of Revelations. Theorist Emile Durkheim regards “profane love” (in his analysis, our mundane daily concerns) in sharp contrast to “sacred love”. 

I am using this El Greco painting as a framework for this body of work. I am interested in what I see as a depiction of the flesh and forms that express a particular perversion that seems to represent that which is both dead and vividly alive. The forms are rendered both in depth and flat, real and ephemeral. I am interested in these contrasts and contradictions. The thin parallel lines in the work are a device to contort the sense of space and disrupt the order of the layers and logic of the image. Agnes Martin is influential in this use of the lines as space 

profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_01.jpg
profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_02.jpg
profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_03.jpg
profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_04.jpg
profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_05.jpg
profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_06.jpg
  “Profane Love”  takes its name from the original title for Domenikos Theotokopoulos’s (El Greco) last and unfinished work (the title since been changed to  The Opening of the Fifth Seal) . The imagery of this massive unfinished painting is the depiction of a cry for vengeance against oppressors from the Book of Revelations. Theorist Emile Durkheim regards “profane love” (in his analysis, our mundane daily concerns) in sharp contrast to “sacred love”.   I am using this El Greco painting as a framework for this body of work. I am interested in what I see as a depiction of the flesh and forms that express a particular perversion that seems to represent that which is both dead and vividly alive. The forms are rendered both in depth and flat, real and ephemeral. I am interested in these contrasts and contradictions. The thin parallel lines in the work are a device to contort the sense of space and disrupt the order of the layers and logic of the image. Agnes Martin is influential in this use of the lines as space 
profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_01.jpg
profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_02.jpg
profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_03.jpg
profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_04.jpg
profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_05.jpg
profane_love_vogley_woods_2017_AP_06.jpg

“Profane Love” takes its name from the original title for Domenikos Theotokopoulos’s (El Greco) last and unfinished work (the title since been changed to The Opening of the Fifth Seal). The imagery of this massive unfinished painting is the depiction of a cry for vengeance against oppressors from the Book of Revelations. Theorist Emile Durkheim regards “profane love” (in his analysis, our mundane daily concerns) in sharp contrast to “sacred love”. 

I am using this El Greco painting as a framework for this body of work. I am interested in what I see as a depiction of the flesh and forms that express a particular perversion that seems to represent that which is both dead and vividly alive. The forms are rendered both in depth and flat, real and ephemeral. I am interested in these contrasts and contradictions. The thin parallel lines in the work are a device to contort the sense of space and disrupt the order of the layers and logic of the image. Agnes Martin is influential in this use of the lines as space 

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